Cardiovascular conditions and physical activity

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Paris, 19 April 2018 (AFP) – According to a new study presented before the European Cardiology Society, a person who survived a heart attack should get back to doing sport or take up a physical activity, rather than stay inactive.

The author of the study, Prof Dr Orjan Ekblom, has calculated that “becoming physically active after a myocardial infarction (heart attack) divides the risk of dying within the following four years by two”. This observation came from having monitored about 22,000 Swedish people, aged 18 to 74, during the four years that followed their heart attack. “It is well known that people who are physically active have lower risk of having a heart attack and higher chances of living longer”, noted Prof Ekblom from Stockholm School of Sport and Health Sciences.

"However, we were not familiar with the incidence of physical exercise among heart attack survivors", he added. On average, during the 4 years following the infraction, the mortality rate was at 2,82% per year among people who were not involved in any physical activity, while it was at 1,14% per year among those who have “increased their physical activity level”.

The lowest mortality rate was reported among people who had already been doing sport and who continued doing it (0,75% per year). This rate was significantly lower than the one among those who “reduced their physical activity level” (1,27% per year). “Doing exercise two or more times a week should be automatically recommended to patients having suffered a heart attack”, says Prof Ekblom, quoted in the press release by European Cardiology Society who held a congress on cardiovascular prevention in Ljubljana. However, he added that “more research is needed to find out if there is a particular physical activity that could be especially beneficial.”

 


AFP (Agence France Presse)

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Cardiovascular conditions and physical activity

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I agree implicitly with the above.

I am positive that those who are more active are definitely at lower risk of having a heart attack.

Again, exercise such as walking is excellent for keeping both the body and mind in order.  

Cardiovascular conditions and physical activity

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Good morning, everyone,

A new study by French researchers confirms that physical activity is a treatment like any other!

Cancer, diabetes, stroke, depression, osteoarthritis or after a heart attack.... Millions of people with chronic diseases should be able to systematically benefit from adapted, prescription-based physical activity programs. The goal? Fewer hospitalizations and recurrences, higher survival, less frequent symptoms (asthma attacks) and less severe pain (osteoarthritis of the lower limbs).

Experts also recommend that physical activity be prescribed before any drug treatment for mild to moderate depression, type 2 diabetes, obesity and leg arteritis. To this end, partnerships should be developed with sports federations, clubs and other associations to overcome the lack of available structures.

Cardiac rehabilitation based on physical activity leads to a 30% decrease in cardiovascular mortality. For breast cancer, according to studies involving several hundred thousand patients, physical activity leads to a reduction of about 40% in overall mortality, 30-35% in specific mortality (tumor-related) and 25 to 30% in the risk of recurrence, and the figures are roughly equivalent for colon cancer, according to the study.

What do you think of that? Has your doctor ever prescribed physical activity sessions for you?

 @cklion@Pazxcio@Jontt44@bigbill@Sresti87@melanie74@Philip1958@Jean11@WinterSky@Knighhawk@pipsmam@Jeanhardy@merlinsmidwife@saoirse@Maggie-mae@Sandykg@suegreen@robjmckinney@Mikejohn@cassydee@astro123@nineteen_gale@richard0804@Zachou1@Andy 67@Mobee22@Titus48‍ 

 

Cardiovascular conditions and physical activity


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This is nothing new. Its been a known fact that exercises and keeping active increases your life span. it is good not only for body, but for mind and soul too. People with more sedentary life are at higher risk of having a heart attack, Stroke, Diabetes Cancer and many other illnesses than those who are physically active. Not every one is fortunate enough to have the ability to exercise, but every little helps. Gentle walking, swimming, even chair exercises for those who are physically impaired counts. Unfortunately GPs do not have the time to go through your life style and prescribe physical exercises other than physio for specific pain. Having said that, some are very good in giving their time to their patients without rushing them out the door. Fortunately, mine is one of them.

nineteen_gale

Cardiovascular conditions and physical activity


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I'm currently recovering from a heart attack and my husband has been encouraging me to go for long walks and things but I'm honestly very scared about it. I know it's good for me but I'm afraid I'll just have another heart attack or I'll cross paths now with someone who has the coronavirus. Does anyone have any tips for getting back into it?

Cardiovascular conditions and physical activity


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@Flora75‍ 

You have to stop being afraid and be positive and get into the mode of regular physical exercising. There is a higher chance of you having a heart attack if you do not start doing regular exercises. It strengthens your hear muscles and reduces the risk oh another heart attack. Regards crossing path with a positive case of corona virus, it is entirely up to you. You can use the face covering, walk in the field or a quieter place and avoid any walkers/joggers by crossing to the other side when you see them approach. Be positive, make up your mind that you can do it, exercise regularly and eat heart healthy diet with less or no saturated fats, lots of fresh fruits nuts and seeds vegetables, and you will turn the corner. Now you asked for the tips, and I haqve given them to you. It is now upto you what you do with it. Good luck

Cardiovascular conditions and physical activity


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@Flora75 I understand that fear. After a big cardiac event it's scary and stressful to get back into things. Or I know it was for me.  I'd say go slow and at your own pace. After my MI a friend of mine passed along this site from the Canadian heart and stroke foundation. They have a pretty detailed weekly plan you can follow and if I remember correctly a guide you can download with tips and information about living with a heart condition. I remember it helping me a lot, so maybe it'd be of interest to you as well: https://www.heartandstroke.ca/articles/exercising-when-you-have-heart-disease

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