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Best comment

Carenity members react daily to comments and responses within a discussion. The best comments are those that have received the most "Helpful Response" reactions. These comments are deemed useful by the community and are likely to be of service to the community at large.

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avatar chrissie2018

avatar mr chipps

avatar SP3RDN4

I take each day as it comes, try to have a focus for that day. Today is pretty good, but it gives me a nudge every now and again. H

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avatar anne2211

avatar cwright17

avatar Somya.P

Good morning 😁

I've seen positive posts regarding copaxone, but it didn't fare well for me being on it. Was on it for 5 years, then tried on tysabri after I had new lesions on my spine (c3/c4) but I couldn't take more than the 1 dose because I'm JCV positive. So, back on copaxone I went for a few months before I had a status epilepticus event and was hospitalised for 27 days. I was given IV prednisolone, and I continued the copaxone injections until I got a call from my MS nurse telling me to stop my copaxone on X date, as my neuro had enough evidence to get me on ocrevus! It's a wonder drug! And now I'm looking at going on kesimpta later this year! Sure, I'll be doing self injections again, but at least it's only once monthly, apart from my starter doses, rather than 3 times a week 48 hours apart 😅

But, do what feels best in your heart and mind. You can always ask to change drugs if you don't feel its working enough 🫂 good luck ❤️

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avatar tharrison

avatar Pippadog

avatar BrianM

I think throughout life one suffers from all the stated anxieties but as one grows older, more experience, encouragement, support one can jump from one to another leaving some, or most of the old feelings behind tucked away but they can rear their ugly feelings at times, it's trying to find a suppressant method.

I personally feel secure this has taken many years to develop gaining life experiences, knowledge and confidence so if the demons return I can cope with them to stop any damage they would like to do. Everyone is different.

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avatar Rolandv111

avatar Evelynnn

avatar lesmal

What child does not have issues these days, certainly mine have issues ranging from self harm, drug abuse, mental health issues, sexual abuse etc. etc. Getting them to talk about it has always been an issue and getting help from the NHS a lost cause. Is there anyone in the family close to you daughter that may be able to get her to talk as parents sometimes are seen as the enemy or they don't want you to know they have made a mistake. Sadly today children seem to be glued to the 'online experiencies' rather than making direct friends. We were very worried about my daughter as she had no direct local friends, her whole life based online. It was not until we had some chats with friends that this seem to be a trend.

If you can gain some hint of her 'problem' there are some excellent groups on Facebook that can inform and share real experience of diverse problems. I must admit I found out to late of such groups and how useful they are, virtually every subject/issue is covered. I just had the delight of adopting our granddaughter through an SGO, the worst experience of our lives. Both parents have mental health problems, both tried to commit suicide, self harm etc. during the process. Social Services were terrible, lying in court, appalling dishonesty and no help anywhere. We won our case despite objections from Social Services the judge saw through their lies. But the point is, I found the Facebook groups with lots of similar experiencies of people all over the country, all to late but we were not alone. So my point is, try to identify her area of issues and look for a group with similar experiencies.

I had to section my son for a few days earlier this year but the NHS system is broken and discharging them quickly seems to be their intention. They now have him on various drugs and increasing strength, the Mother of our grandchild with serious mental issues where I supervise her on any contact, as directed by the courts. I have used various phycologists and therapists over many years and recent a therapist with our grandchild to check out our concerns, she was fantastic, no issues found thankfully. So there are various options for sourcing them online locally, therapists cheaper than phycologists. For the recent therapist, last year it was £55 a session and years ago phycologists triple or a lot more.

You may find it may be bullying of somekind and not more serious problems, talking is the best way to get a hint of the issue. Good luck!

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avatar lesmal

avatar VICKICOFFEY

To be quite honest, I have experienced a low libido. Thankfully my husband understands and his libido is low as well--he in his early 70's and me in my mid 60's. Neither of us have a problem with the lack of sexual intimacy...we make up for it with other physical touch--hugging, cuddling, kissing. etc. I have broached the topic with a few close friends and shockingly, they are in the same boat.

My advise would be, don't listen to what other people are doing behind closed doors...do what works for you and your partner--you're not competing with anyone about anything. No two couples are alike, and what is natural for some, may not be natural for others. In my opinion, its only a problem if one of the two of you isn't comfortable with the way things are. If this becomes the case, then speak to your doctor to find out what help they can offer.

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avatar Polina.K

avatar lesmal

avatar anxietyisme

@Pippadog Yes I switched over to the electric overblankets for nearly tenty years ago and never was cold again. My wife uses her side just to warm her up but I enjoy the full overnight heat and improved my sleep no end. So cheap to use and I have one at my static caravan, very useful this Easter being so cold!

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avatar ladybear1

avatar velocette

avatar Mrs E Larkin

I had a hip replacement 16 months ago due to osteoarthritis. I can honestly say it was the best decision I have ever made. Yes I was not looking forward to everything post op, but I am now 100% mobile and after not being able to walk any distances I now enjoy walking again and I've managed to lose 2.5 stones. Totally pain free and I've had lots of comments about how much happier I look - my face was obviously showing my pain. If you have any questions please ask! 

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avatar JazzyC

avatar robjmckinney

avatar Somya.P

Go to the nearest Chemist and seek help, they can do a lot for you and contact your GP in an emergency. It is better than ending up in A&E!

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avatar Jacqueline61

avatar lesmal

avatar Tigger.co.uk

@LizziB I see it from a different perspective. He's not the only person with cancer, and by sharing it of course gets top VIP treatment from the Government, the public and private medical professionals. Many people are still on a horrific waiting list for diagnosis alone but because of the royalty and his title he is immediately treated. My husband has both skin and prostate cancer and deals with the government hospitals like the normal public. He has waited 4 years alone for radiotherapy treatment which he only started yesterday. Hormonal injections, chemotherapy, waiting for hospital and doctor's appointments, cancellation of appointments and more have had a massive impact on both of us, including all of the side effects that have come with the treatment so far given. I am so grateful to the NHS for all they have done for him so far.

I don't agree with the way it takes over the news, media and more when other people with cancer are just left alone.

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avatar Elaineanne

avatar robjmckinney

avatar sadone

Hi @sadone just seen this discussion & felt the need to ‘jump into’ too. I think your other 3 ‘correspondents’ all had invaluable suggestions re: how to move on. I personally feel whenever situations like yours are experienced, the person (i.e. you) does naturally feel so alone but truly believe the vast majority of us have been ‘where you are’ at the moment.

I was widowed just over 4 years ago, have a multitude of health conditions & now 72. I have lived on my own since my husband passed & NO, I don’t think it’s ever easy but life does carry - probably never the easiest task we all have to do. This certainly does take time and the time this takes, I’ve found, can vary between each of us - I’m sincerely hoping you will feel/begin to know when the time is right for you to do this.

I’ve, personally, have always struggled with ‘accepting’ what life continues to throw at myself but perhaps because of needing to get on, eventually, have increasingly found I had 2 choices in these situations. 1- I could stay in the dark, unhappy place where I was or 2- CHANGE this by thinking/actively doing things differently. Instead of staying in my house alone / avoiding going out un til I had no choice, I made myself go out, initially to do some necessary shopping and then including thinking/planning, even if just looking (& not actually buying) anything that could possibly/hopefully help me to smile, be happier again.

Time really has been a great healer for me. I had been bereaved & felt bereft a number of times in the past. The 1 person always being ‘left behind/alone’ being myself, so consequently, slowly came to the conclusion, I needed to rely on myself, learn to ‘find the person’ I’d been’ before being on my own. I began by re-connecting/interacting more with the people that had been part of my life ‘before’. This somehow expanded to going to different places, meeting new people - sometimes they became part of my current life, sometimes not. All of these connections simply involved social interactions only. I’ve always strongly believed & had experienced that my ‘romantic relationships’ evolved without any pre-planning whatsoever - if/when things are ‘meant to be’ they naturally happen. At the moment @sadone, perhaps simply focus on yourself - hopefully find out ‘who YOU actually are’? Life has a way, if/when I’ve simply kept myself open to whatever comes my way. Wishing you all the very best in the future.



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Hela

Hela Ammar

Pharmacist, Hela is a data scientist at Carenity. Using her scientific and medical knowledge, she supports various project managers to carry out real-life studies conducted with members of the community. A graduate of the Faculty of Pharmacy of Monastir in Tunisia, Hela holds a PharmD. After an internship as a market analyst at the Ministry of Public Health in Tunisia and an internship as an assistant diabetology product manager, she decided to complete a specialized master's degree in Pharmaceutical and Biotechnology Management at ESCP Business School. Hela joined Carenity in May 2022 as a data scientist after completing her end-of-study internship at Novartis as a junior product manager working with solutions for severe asthma. Through her various experiences in hospitals and pharmacies, Hela has had the opportunity to work closely with patients and has developed a deep knowledge of chronic diseases. 

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Lizzi Bollinger is a Community Manager for the US and UK communities at Carenity. She also writes articles for the Health Magazine. Lizzi is responsible for member engagement, she supports patients and their families on a daily basis by animating and moderating Carenity's English-speaking communities and she participates in improving the site to allow members to navigate it more easily.

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Somya currently works as a Community Manager on the Carenity team. Her main role is to engage and moderate the community in the US/UK markets, ensuring members have an excellent experience. Additionally, she writes and translates health articles and creates content for social media platforms. She has a Master’s degree in International Brand Management from NEOMA Business School. Outside of work, Somya enjoys singing, dancing, theatre, cooking, and exploring new places.

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What our members have to say

These are quotes and opinions submitted by Carenity members. Here patients, their loved ones, and those interested in their health share their experiences and opinions about the Carenity forum and what they have learned from talking to other patients.

"I've had osteoarthritis for about 20 years now. I have been on several NSAIDs, corticosteroids and recently I had knee surgery. I hope my experience can help others."

UK-US_Gina

Gina
Osteoarthritis, Patient
73 years old

"I am always looking for good advice on living with cardiovascular disease. My brother had a stroke 3 years ago and it was a wake-up call for the whole family. I think it’s great to talk to people who share similar experiences."

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Eddie
Stroke, Relative
56 years old

"I was diagnosed with RRMS when I was young and it has now progressed to SPMS. The transition has been difficult for me. Carenity gives me a chance to find support and advice."

UK-US_Julia

Julia
Multiple sclerosis, Patient
55 years old

"Carenity has really helped me open up about my AS. I can always ask other patients for advice on my medications and treatments and I don't feel alone anymore."

UK-US_Kevin

Kevin
Ankylosing spondylitis, Patient
64 years old

"I've been in and out of depression for years and just need to talk about it with people who understand! It's great to have a place like Carenity to turn to where I can talk to other people who understand what it's like battling mental illness."

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Mark
Depression, Patient
44 years old

"People don't understand how difficult it is to have Crohn's. It's a relief to share my thoughts and worries with other patients who get me."

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Pete
Crohn's disease, Patient
28 years old