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Osteoarthritis: Knee joint degeneration slowed with weight loss, study confirms

2 May 2017 • 1 comment

Osteoarthritis: Knee joint degeneration slowed with weight loss, study confirms
A new study provides evidence that losing weight can slow the development of osteoarthritis of the knee by reducing the degeneration of knee cartilage.

Researchers found that overweight or obese adults experienced slower degeneration of knee joint structures after losing 5 or 10 percent of their body weight over 4 years, compared with those who did not lose weight.

Lead study author Dr. Alexandra Gersing, of the Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging at the University of California-San Francisco, and colleagues recently reported their findings in the journal Radiology.

Being overweight or obese is a major risk factor for OA; the excess weight can put extra pressure on the joints and cartilage, causing "wear and tear."

Furthermore, Dr. Gersing and colleagues note that higher levels of body fat can lead to an increase in substances in the blood that trigger joint inflammation, which can raise the risk of OA.

For their study, the researchers set out to gain a better understanding of how weight loss affects joint health.

"We looked at the degeneration of all knee joint structures, such as menisci, articular cartilage, and bone marrow," notes Dr. Gersing.

Menisci are the pieces of fibrous cartilage that cushion and protect the surface of joints, while articular cartilage is the smooth, connective tissue that covers the ends of bones.

Weight loss slowed degeneration of menisci, articular cartilage

The researchers analyzed data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative, which included 640 adults who were either overweight or obese. All participants either had risk factors for OA or mild to moderate OA, as determined by MRI scans. Over a period of 48 months, the researchers monitored changes in subjects' weight, as well as changes in knee degeneration.

Based on their weight changes over the 4-year period, participants were divided into three groups: adults who had lost more than 10 percent of their body weight, adults who had lost between 5 and 10 percent of their body weight, and adults who experienced no change in weight (the controls).

Compared with the control group, the researchers found that adults who had lost at least 5 percent of their body weight experienced slower knee cartilage degeneration, and this effect was even stronger among participants who lost more than 10 percent of their body weight.

"The most exciting finding of our research was that not only did we see slower degeneration in the articular cartilage, we saw that the menisci degenerated a lot slower in overweight and obese individuals who lost more than 5 percent of their body weight, and that the effects were strongest in overweight individuals and in individuals with substantial weight loss," says Dr. Gersing.

Overall, the researchers believe that their results demonstrate how weight loss may lower the risk of OA among individuals who are overweight or obese.

MedicalNewsToday.com

Comments

CazzaJane42
on 21/10/2017

Over the last 5-6 weeks I have had severe pain in my right leg, mostly behind my knee; it was so bad for a few days that I could not put any weight on my leg at all, it is not that bad now but I still have pain and great discomfort. My GP thinks it is possibly OA but am awaiting results of an X-ray taken just over two weeks ago.  I am not a gym fan but I do walk my dog twice a day on the beach. I am going to buy an exercise bike today so hopefully that will also keep my more agile, plus I hope to lose weight. I am not obese BUT I could easily lose a stone and a half so that is my goal.

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