«
»

Top

End-of-Lockdown Anxiety

26 May 2020 • 9 comments

Fear of infection, panic on public transport or in shops, readjustment to work, the need for consumerism, social pressure... The fears caused by the end of the COVID-19 lockdown are numerous.

End-of-Lockdown Anxiety

According to the Office for National Statistics, almost three-quarters (72%) of adults in Great Britain are concerned about the effect that the COVID-19 pandemic is having on their life and approximately one-third are feeling anxious or stressed! This is not surprising when we know that a period in quarantine of only 10 days can predictive of post-traumatic stress disorder, according to a synthesis of 24 studies carried out in 10 different countries by The Lancet

Social anxiety and impulsive behaviour

This emotional state even has a name: cabin fever. It corresponds to the fear of leaving home or of coming into contact with others again after a long period of isolation. The variety and intensity of the symptoms is specific to each person: fatigue, difficulty getting out of bed in the morning or needing frequent naps, lethargy, sadness or depression, loss of patience, irritability, etc. 

Social phobias are thus on the rise, such as agoraphobia (fear of crowds, of a place from which it is difficult to be rescued), anthropophobia (fear of people, also known as social anxiety disorder) or blemmophobia (fear of the gaze of others, of being judged or perceived as abnormal). Excessive behaviour and the need to "make up for lost time", such as taking risks to find loved ones, compulsive shopping, overeating or drinking, etc., are also common.

How can I come out of lockdown successfully?

This period is all the more difficult as there are still many uncertainties. Mental or emotional overload can be alleviated if the rules are clear and the measures are concrete: wear a mask, follow markings on the floor in shops, respect physical distances, etc.

Therefore, if you are suffering from anxiety, don't hesitate to go for a walk in the open air or nature if you can. This will allow you to get back in touch with the outdoors while enjoying the spring weather. Get back into a good sleeping pattern by setting your alarm clock in the morning and cutting back on naps during the day. Plan outings with defined objectives: go shopping for a specific recipe, walk around the neighbourhood, bring your glass bottles to a recycling bin, etc. 

Above all, be kind to yourself, do things at your own pace during this mourning phase. You must accept that daily life will be turned upside down again and that life will not be exactly the same as before. Do not hesitate to contact a professional if you feel the need, you can also consult the Samaritans mental health support platform for free, by phone, email, or their new mobile app.

Finally, while it is essential to remain vigilant and to respect the barrier gestures, keep in mind that in case of infection, the seriousness of the disease is most often very low with, on average, a rate of serious complications below 15% and a mortality rate below 1%. Obviously, these rates are higher in those at risk, such as the elderly, who require even more rigorous precautions than others. But even if they have conditions identified as risk factors (obesity, diabetes, cancer and other chronic diseases), the vast majority of adults do not develop severe forms. If you have any doubts about the precautions you should take, do not hesitate to contact your medical team. 

Helpful links

  • The Samaritans: emotional support 24 hours a day - in full confidence. Call 116 123 or email jo@samaritans.org.uk
  • Shout Crisis Text Line: for support in a crisis, text Shout to 85258.
  • Anxiety UK: Charity providing support if you have been diagnosed with an anxiety condition. Call 03444 775 774 (M-F 9:30am-10pm, S-S 10am-8pm)
  • Rethink Mental Illness: Support and advice for people living with mental illness. Call 0300 5000 927 (M-F 9:30am-4pm)
  • SANE: Emotional support, information and guidance for people affected by mental illness, their families and carers. Call 0300 304 7000  (Daily 4:30pm-10:30pm)
    Textcare: comfort and care via text message, sent when the person needs it most: www.sane.org.uk/textcare
    Peer support forum: www.sane.org.uk/supportforum


Was this article helpful to you? Do you have any thoughts to share with the community?

Take care and stay home!

avatar Léa Blaszczynski

Author: Léa Blaszczynski, In charge of the patient's experience

With a background in communication specialised in digital, Léa has been working at Carenity since 2013 with the objective of helping as many patients and their families as possible to find support and no longer feel... >> Learn more

Comments

jaycee
on 29/05/2020

I'm in a position where lockdown didn't bother me at all so coming out of it is nothing for me to worry about either, I don't need to go out so I won't go out until it's literally gone completely however long it takes

Shell47
on 29/05/2020

I'm not totally anxious about the lockdown being reduced as I'm on the shielding list as a vunerble person so nothing has changed for me I'm still in without seeing anyone until the end of June and I think it's going to be extended

Daisybuster
on 29/05/2020
I’m shielding at moment, so no a problem at the moment but worry about family members.
Judithm
on 29/05/2020

My letter apparently runs out on June the 15th and I have been informed by my employer that's when I have too go back even though the shielding has been extended too the 30th they have told me if I want the extra time off I will have too get a sick note o can't get a sick note its getting so worrying 

Bridge67
on 29/05/2020
Very worried about returning to work on 15 th june hopefully it will be a little bit better by then but could all spike by then ! Dont know how my wife has worked through it so far been in the NHS and frontline

You will also like

Castleman Disease: Everything you need to know!

Castleman disease

Castleman Disease: Everything you need to know!

Read the article
Melanoma: How do you know if a mole is dangerous?

Melanoma: How do you know if a mole is dangerous?

Read the article
Meet Marie-Gabrielle, our Product & Engagement Manager

Meet Marie-Gabrielle, our Product & Engagement Manager

Read the article
COVID-19 & Biologics: Patients Share their Experience

COVID-19 & Biologics: Patients Share their Experience

Read the article