Prostate cancer fact sheet

Prostate Cancer is a development of cancer cells in the male sex gland in charge of producing semen called prostate. Prostate cancer is frequently developing in men around the globe, even if the causes are unknown.

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Prostate Cancer

It is estimated that 1 out of 7 men in the world lives with this condition and that the average age at which they were or will be diagnosed is 66.

Contrary to other cancers like pancreas, which develop fast, prostate cancer grows slowly, so for years you may already be living with it, and not have any visible signs. 

There are no specific reasons known to why Prostate cancer develops. The most common cause we can mention is the age factor, which leaves all men over 50 vulnerable to this disease. Through a man's life, the prostate, which has the size of a nut and locates between the penis and the bladder, can increase its size and block the urethra or the bladder, causing problems in urinating or interfering with sexual performance. 

Having prostate cancer is not easy for the patient, nor for their close ones, which sometimes leaves the patient facing the disease alone. This is why it is so important to find people that are willing to listen and to share their stories, so we can get help and a better understanding of our condition.

Sometimes the problem can just stay there, with an enlarged bladder. This condition is called 'benign prostatic hyperplasia', which gives some trouble, as previously mentioned, but won't develop into cancer. In other cases, the complication will escalate to frequent urination, weak flow, and unexplained weight loss, amongst others; which most frequently will lead to a cancer diagnosis.

I have prostate cancer

When having prostate cancer, we should never feel bad or ashamed about asking for help or inquiring about things related to the condition, like exams, treatments and even the most intimate aspects.

Prevention is the best tool doctors have in the fight against prostate cancer. Year after year, more patients get tested early and this has helped to decrease the mortality related to this condition. The 5 year survival rate is between 80% and 90%. However, the prognosis is poor when the cancer has already turned into metastasis or it is just too advanced. Prognostic factors for prostate cancer are: the tumour size and the appearance of the cells. The smaller the tumor size and the healthier the cells, the greater the chance of being able to fight against it or of not having to treat it at all.
 
Nonetheless, autopsies have shown that men who died of other causes, also had prostate cancer and neither them nor their GPs ever noticed it.

American Cancer Society
NHS

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Skulls

“I've been living with prostate cancer for the past 2 years. At first I was really confused, but...”

ajones

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peterpan

“Living with prostate cancer for the last months haven't been easy, but it is good to know that...”

They joined the Carenity community

Skulls

“I've been living with prostate cancer for the past 2 years. At first I was really confused, but...”

ajones

“My husband was diagnosed with prostate cancer last year and this forum has taught me and my husband...”

peterpan

“Living with prostate cancer for the last months haven't been easy, but it is good to know that...”

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