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Patients Depression

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Topic of the discussion

Carenity Member • Community manager
Posted on
Good advisor

Hello everyone,

Some people with depression benefit from making lifestyle changes such as more exercise, better diet, less alcohol.

Have you ever considered (or maybe tried) this? Or is it too much to deal with on top of the depression?

Please feel free to share your thoughts and experience here.

All the best,

Marina

Beginning of the discussion - 21/01/2015

Depression and lifestyle changes
Carenity Member
Posted on

Hi Marina,

I totally agree with what you were saying. I suffer BPD. I spent a few years battling drug addiction and in overcoming this spent a year slipping into alcohol dependency, it is something I am working on carefully with a dependency team to help reduce alcohol slowly which is necessary but I have noticed when I slip into an episode it is very important I reduce my alcohol intake as if I keep drinking it makes the episode I am going through a lot more intense.

Regards 

Ben 

Depression and lifestyle changes
Carenity Member
Posted on

Hello

I remember when I was first diagnosed with anxiety and depression (2007) I was very inactive and very overweight.

I also remember my GP saying that it took lots of things to get me to where I am and so it  will take me lots of things to get me well again. Do in additon to the anti depressants  she recommended changing my diet,starting  an exercise plan and a talking therapy.

Eeventually the crippling depression lifted but I am still left with generalised anxiety - which I know if I key get out of control then it will turn into depression. One of my ways of managing this is my diet ( it's taken many years but up to now have lost 6 plus stone) and exercise - I now power walk and run and by no means a great athelete but by god it clears my head!

sorry for the long answer but I hope it helps

Depression and lifestyle changes
1

Carenity Member
Posted on

as a sufferer of mental health since 2007 i think that for me exercise such as attending a gym has had a positive effect not always easy suffering with anxiety and depression 

Depression and lifestyle changes
Carenity Member
Posted on

I'm suffering from mental health since my very early teens & find excercise does help wen my mind is rite but when I'm clinically depressed & anxious I can bearly get out of the bed, it's very hard ESP with social anxiety, is there anyone else who has social anxiety?

Depression and lifestyle changes
Carenity Member
Posted on

I find personally just keeping myself busy in general helps, as I find my depression to be more of an issue when I'm sat or standing still.

Depression and lifestyle changes
Carenity Member
Posted on

Totally agree.  I used to love going out, but then would drink too much, and spend a few days with very high anxiety levels and following this depression.  I have cut down on alcohol, and only go out with people I know I wouldn't feel the need to get completely plastered with!  I have a very understanding husband too, which helps immensely.  

Depression and lifestyle changes
Carenity Member
Posted on
Good advisor

Alcohol has never seem to have had a depressive effect on me, which is strange but I know diet and exercise really help with feeling good. The problem is when you start to slip into depression the harder it gets to find the motivation to exercise, go food shopping etc. I fall into a cycle of lying in bed all day, until there's only the option of a takeaway at night and no desire to exercise as I'm often constantly exhausted when depressed.

Depression and lifestyle changes
1

Carenity Member
Posted on

Hello.

I try to do exercise everyday and it helps me a little bit. However, sometimes I find it hard to leave home and start running or whatever. Some days I just want to spend the whole day at bed.

Depression and lifestyle changes
1

Carenity Member
Posted on

I've become very over weight in the last two years but can't get the energy or motivation to exercise.